A letter to Romania

 

Dear Romania,

 

I’m Alexandra ***, your citizen since 1993, but who left you in 2005 to live in Kuwait. I don’t remember much from the period before I left, or maybe I do, but nothing important really happened as I was too small to care anyway.

I grew up in a place where life is much easier. I grew up in a place where children, as I was when I went there, were deeply respected and treated really well. I grew up in a place where Westerners like me, were seen really good. There was no problem. I made friends. I got to know people. Kuwait became my home. I knew all the places, even the smallest streets. I never wanted to leave the country.

But university time came and my parents convinced me to come back to you. Although at first I didn’t want it, I decided to give it a try and show them that I can manage anywhere, even here by your side, where I knew nothing. I didn’t know how life was. I didn’t know how the people were.

Here with you, I’ve encountered many problems, but I didn’t want to give up. It all started when I wanted to enroll in one of your universities. Because I’ve studied in Kuwait, in a British system I lost the first admission session due to my late results. I was about to loose the second one too, but thankfully the dean of the university I am in, deeply supported me.

Your people are bad. They’re selfish. They don’t care about the ones around them, they just care about themselves. Your people are not like the ones I’m used to. They’re not warm and supportive. They see you naive and innocent and the first though they get is ‘how can I use this person?! Suck them up of all their resources, of all their energy!’ or at least this is what I feel.

During the time spent with you, this feeling grew stronger. I’ve felt this even more, because all I did was meet those kind of people. Those kind of people who would see me as a nice person, who cares about her ‘friends’. They came along, used what and how they could and threw me off to the garbage.

Why?

Because your people still have a lot to learn. Because your people lived through tough times, which made them act like animals in a jungle.. who kills first, survives.

Moreover, I’ve seen who is worth being called a friend and who isn’t. There were similar events in Kuwait too, but it was different. Or at least, it seemed different. Things weren’t so harsh. Things weren’t like this. Everyone would jump in to help you if you needed anything. Everyone would be there to support you.. there were my bestest friends.

Why do you have to mistreat your citizens who left you? Is it like a revenge? Are you not treating them equally just because they left you? Shouldn’t you treat them the same like the ones who stayed? Shouldn’t you be proud that for a reason or another they have returned?

Instead of making them feel good that they came back to you, you’re making them regret the moment they’ve crossed your border. 

Why?

People are making fun of them. Looking weird at them. Looking as if they were some kind of aliens. Well, to them, they are. Just because they lived in another place for so long and came back..

The authorities are not taking them into consideration, unless the President needs support. When he does so, the state, your leaders, remember that there are some people outside your borders who can be helpful.

Why?

Your police has no ideea about rules given by organisations, agencies and so on. They don’t know whether a passport is good or not, for example (as it happened in my situation). But we, as your citizens and people who didn’t live close by you, have to pay money for that, have to pay taxes and we loose it all in the end.

Is it fair? Why?

How do we feel when we come back to you and this is how we are treated?

How do I feel when I come here, I study, I put all my power and knowledge into your university, into you, as a country and I for example reach the airport and I get told I can’t travel to Kuwait because I have a temporary passport? Funny thing that your police has no idea and it is all due to the great, Turkish Airlines. Even more funny is that your embassy in Kuwait (who’s made up of great people, really), says that it is like this for those people who have no one in Kuwait and have no connection with the country, not for me, who has lived there for about half of my life.

How to feel when at first I’m so excited about leaving, seeing my family there, my friends.. the places and then I just can’t?

How?

How is that?

Is this equality?

No.

The lifestyle of the people who live or lived outside you, and came back, whether they came back for good or for a limited period, is not the same with the lifestyle of the people who did not leave you. 

 

 

With love, but sadness,

Alexandra.

A very nationalistic citizen, who loves you more than anything and who is very proud with you, but who is hurt and disappointed by the treatment she receives here.

 

2 thoughts on “A letter to Romania

  1. This is a very awful treatment one can get from his/her country of origin.
    I mean they should treat those who are living outside Romania even better to gain their trust in a way that maybe those proffisional ppl working overseas come back and benifit Romania.

    Your words made me go straight to google maps to check where exactly Romania is. I think Romania is like Ukraine. It got its democracy very late may be that’s why ppl there still cruel or just can’t get out of there past.

    My father traveled to Ukraine once. That three years ago if I recall that right. He planned to stay there for two week but he returned after four days because of the corruption and bad ppl there. I don’t know if Romania’s the same but you remaind me of that.

    Moreover, your words made me thinking that society I’m in isn’t that bad. I mean maybe it’s bad but it could be worse. So it’s good .
    The ppl in Kuwait pay a huge respect for the western ppl that’s a good point

    And it appeared you’re too good for your country. I hate being around ppl who use my kindness for their own personal benefits. I encountered many selfish ppl here. The sad part is that one would not realize that he is dealing with such ppl until he get somthing like a slap in the face
    But I believe in being kind all the way. So I stay kind. And you should stay the unspoiled naive and innocent, the way you are. Cause it’s the way to change the world and at least the way to find good friends

    I hope you come back anytime soon and enjoy family and friends 🙂

    1. Due to the fact that Romania’s Communist regime only fell a bit over 20 years ago, the people are still endocrynated with that weird mentality and they are only for themselves, trying to suck all your resources and energy as I have mentioned in the post.

      Not all people are bad and to be honest, you can’t really blame them, but the society they live in. But I really didn’t expect it to be that way.. I mean, it’s weird.

      For sure Kuwait’s society isn’t that bad, matter of fact, I felt like home there and I will always be divided into two countries because God chose half of my life to be spent in Romania, while the other half in Kuwait.

      I’ve been used back there too, but I mean, one would expect that as they are in a foreign country, but to go through this in your home country too? Isn’t it too much?

      That’s actually my wish, to change the world. But it’s sad when I see that there aren’t too many people who share my views. There are a lot who wish to change the world, but in the cliche kinda way. I want it for real and I’ve always tried to do so.

      Thank you so much for your beautiful comment, this and all of them. They really mean a lot to me, as they are very supportive.
      Hope to come home soon and spend as much time with my dear ones!

      3eed Mbarak!

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